International edition
October 19, 2021

Restarted process

California: Redding Rancheria's proposed Win-River casino move to tribal land revives

California: Redding Rancheria's proposed Win-River casino move to tribal land revives
Win-River Casino Resort in Redding, California.
United States | 09/28/2021

The casino resort's move to a tribe-owned property next to I-5 and Churn Creek Road is seeing an update as the Federal Government has restarted the environmental impact report process on the venue migration. There is no deadline yet for the federal government to make a decision on the transfer to land, which was first applied for in 2016.

T

he Redding Rancheria’s proposed Win-River Resort & Casino move is back on the table, as the Federal Government has restarted the environmental impact report process on the venue migration.

The tribe has plans to move its Win-River Resort & Casino, an almost 70,000-square feet venue on approximately 232 acres next to I-5, just south of S. Bonnyview Rd., to a tribe-owned property next to Interstate 5 and Churn Creek Road, California.

“We’re excited!,” said Redding Rancheria CEO Tracy Edwards, reports KRCR. “Today, the federal government published in their ranks that we’re restarting our process for moving the tribe’s property into trust.”

The casino resort features 250 rooms on a 9-story hotel with conference and event centers. It also features centers, restaurants, retail facilities, and more. In terms of gaming, it features 600 slot machines and 12 table games.

“We are very pleased that this administration is following through on their commitment to work with indigenous communities and respecting tribal sovereignty,” added Edwards. Moreover, she expressed excitement at the prospect of the government working with the tribe on putting land into trusts so that the casino can be eventually moved.

The Redding Rancheria tribe needs to secure approval from the Bureau of Indian Affairs. While permission from Shasta County and the City of Redding is not required, Edwards says they are doing what is possible to work along with all parties involved.

“We’re hoping that with the federal government’s willingness to start discussions again, this will trickle down to the local level and that we’ll be able to actively participate and work with both the city and the county to come to an agreement and work towards getting this project going,” said the CEO according to the previously cited news source.

The tribe’s mission is to be “transparent,” claims Edwards. “We want to mitigate any of the off-reservation impacts, like traffic; like law enforcement,” she added. “We want to work with the local governments in a way that can help mitigate those impacts.”

In regards to a timeline for the casino to move, there is no deadline yet for the federal government to make a decision on the transfer to land. The land-to-trust application was first submitted in November 2016 to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. It was initially announced that the new venue would also see an expansion into a 140,000 square feet casino.

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