Echoing the claims made in a similar suit against Encore Boston Harbor

Class-action filed against MGM Springfield over blackjack payouts

MGM Springfield said its following state regulations on the payouts and cited an advisory opinion from the Massachusetts Gaming Commission, Mass Live reports.
2019-08-05
United States
Reading time 1:19 min
Blackjack players argue the Massachusetts casino is paying less than state regulations permit on winning hands at some tables.

A class-action lawsuit was submitted last week in Hampden Superior Court against MGM Springfield, in which the plaintiffs claim that the casino paid customers odds of 6 to 5 when a player is dealt a blackjack, even though Massachusetts law states that a player who is dealt a blackjack "shall be paid at odds of 3 to 2."

MGM Springfield said its following state regulations on the payouts and cited an advisory opinion from the Massachusetts Gaming Commission, Mass Live reports.

A similar lawsuit was filed against Wynn ResortsEncore Boston Harbor two weeks ago, claiming also that customers were being short-changed but the regulator determined “preliminarily” that Encore was in compliance with state regulations.

Elaine Driscoll, spokeswoman for the Massachusetts Gaming Commission, said the commission is aware of the MGM Springfield lawsuit and is evaluating it as it determines the appropriate next steps.

"We comply with all Massachusetts Gaming Commission regulations and feel confident that this lawsuit will be found to have no merit," said MGM Springfield spokesman Saverio Mancini.

According to Massachusetts Gaming Commission rules, winning bets payout 1 to 1 unless the player is dealt a blackjack, in which case the winning bets is paid out at odds of 3 to 2 or odds of 6 to 5. The odds are posted at each table, the Gaming Commission says in its regulations.

In response to the suit against Encore, the Massachusetts Gaming Commission investigation and Enforcement Bureau reviewed the claims and determined “preliminarily” that Encore was in compliance with state regulations. But chairwoman Cathy Judd-Stein said the casino would still be monitored. "We want to make sure we review matters fairly, objectively and transparently," she said.

Leave your comment:
Subscribe to our newsletter
Enter your email to receive the latest news
EVENTS CALENDAR