International edition
March 07, 2021

A 57% decline from the prior year, due the pandemic effects

Detroit's 2020 casino revenue marks largest yearly drop

Detroit's 2020 casino revenue marks largest yearly drop
MotorCity Casino Hotel, Greektown Casino-Hotel and MGM Grand Detroit saw sales drop 57 percent from the prior year to $639 million in 2020.
United States | 01/18/2021

Total revenue generated through sports betting was $18.3 million. For the month of December, the casinos reported $23.9 million in revenue while open just nine days.

T

otal revenue at the three casinos in Detroit, Michigan, was cut by more than half last year because of the coronavirus pandemic, marking the largest yearly revenue drop in the casinos' history.

MotorCity Casino Hotel, Greektown Casino-Hotel and MGM Grand Detroit saw sales drop 57 percent from the prior year to $639 million in 2020, according to the Michigan Gaming Control Board.

Total revenue generated through sports betting was $18.3 million. For the month of December, the casinos reported $23.9 million in revenue while open just nine days.

The declines are due to mandated closures and restrictions, including capacity limits, which drove revenues down much further than the 2008-09 Great Recession, according to control board data. The only year casinos made less revenue than in 2020 was in 1999, the year MGM Grand opened in July and MotorCity opened in December. Greektown opened the following year. The casinos took in a record high $1.454 billion in revenue in 2019.

The Detroit casinos reopened at 15 percent capacity the first week in August after being closed 4 1/2 months to stem the spread of the coronavirus. They were ordered shut again on Nov. 18, then reopened a month later.

Market share percentages among the casinos in 2020 remained consistent with the previous year. MGM had 41 percent, MotorCity had 36 percent and Greektown held 23 percent.

The city of Detroit's share of wagering taxes and development agreements dwindled to $73.8 million in 2020, compared to $184.2 million in 2019. The casinos paid the state $50.3 million in wagering taxes, down from $117.8 million the year prior.

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